Mother and Child

You give birth and overnight your life changes. Now there’s someone else who’s always going  to come first with you.  For the rest of your life.  Even when your kids are grown up, barely a day goes by when you don’t think of them.

Here are some poems I’ve written about the parent/child relationship.

I wrote this first one after the birth of our daughter.

Hannah Sleeping                               

  I watch my child asleep in bed

What dreams can she be dreaming

The little sleepy head

I want to build a wall around her cot

Shield her from the world

Instead I tuck the blankets tight

And kiss my sleeping child goodnight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When she got married in 2010, I wrote this:

I watch my child become a wife

What dreams will she be dreaming

For the rest of her sweet life

Their love will build a wall around their world

Around their lives

And as I take her hand in mine

I wish that I could rewind time.

I wrote this next poem in 1995, about six months before my mother died. 

 Role Reversal

Today, I held my mother

sobbing in my arms

Stroking her soft,  fine hair

Her chin nuzzled on my chest

And I could smell

the unforgotten fragrance

of her skin

I held her close

as I have held my children

and felt the frailty of her age

How odd and imperceptibly

the tables turn

And those that you have leaned on

lean on you

Those that you had turned to

turn to you

Now she is the child

And I am the mother

The 6 March was 22 years to the day that my mother died. It often coincides with Mother’s Day in the UK.

  

I visited the grounds at Hoop Lane crematorium – as I do every year – where her ashes were scattered.

You might think that this is a depressing thing to do. But, at this time of the year, it is uplifting. There are thousands of crocuses as far as the eye can see.

For the first time ever, I had a go at writing a haiku.  This is a three line Japanese poem.  It must have five syllables in the first line, seven in the second and five in the third, final line.

Remembrance

Scattered crocuses

Ashes scattered on the grass:

Scattered memories

 

© Andrea Neidle. My Life in Poems

6 thoughts on “Mother and Child

    1. Thanks Brian. It’s actually an earlier post from 2011. I have recently found out that if you publish online in a blog it counts with some publishers/editors/poetry competitions etc as “being published” so I am now holding back from blogging new poems! I have written a couple of new ones very recently but am not blogging them for now which is why I am resurrecting some of my older blogs. Having said that, my newer followers – of which there a few – probably will not have seen them before.

      Like

  1. There are tender and beautiful thoughts expressed in your poems. Well done for creating a haiku. More important than the number of syllables is the capturing of a moment, most effectively done.
    best wishes
    Tessa

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the role reversal poem. Thank you,

    Valerie

    Le 28/03/2018 à 01:41, My Life in Poems a écrit : > WordPress.com > Andrea Neidle posted: “You give birth and overnight your life changes. > Now there’s someone else who’s always going  to come first with you.  > For the rest of your life.  Even when your kids are grown up, barely a > day goes by when you don’t think of them. Here are some poems I’v” >

    Liked by 1 person

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